Copper Country Architects

Biographical Dictionary of Copper Country Architects

Tag: Demar

Hancock Town Hall and Fire Hall

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by Dany Peavey, Stevan Sliger, John Krystof, and Travis Dvorak. Architect: Charlton, Gilbert, & Demar Alternative Name: Hancock City Hall Location: 399 Quincy Street, Hancock Built: 1898-99 Contractor: E. E. Grip & Co. of Ishpeming Interior Painting: Associated Artists of Milwaukee In February 1898, three architectural firms submitted plans for this commission: William T. Pryor, C. Archibald Pearce, and Charlton, Gilbert & Demar. The latter firm was selected, and the building was […]

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Vivian House

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by Dany Peavey, Stevan Sliger, John Krystof, and Travis Dvorak. Architect: Charlton, Gilbert, & Demar Location: Pewabic and 3rd streets, Laurium Built: 1898 This Shingle Style house has a Jacobsville sandstone first floor and the distinguishing shingles on the second floor. Numerous porches and porticos project, including a squat round tower at one corner and a porte cochere on the opposite side. The semicircular portico has been removed.  Johnson Vivian, Jr., […]

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Kroll Block

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by Dany Peavey, Stevan Sliger, John Krystof, and Travis Dvorak. Architect: Charlton, Gilbert, & Demar Location: 606 Shelden St., Houghton Built: 1897 Contractors: Wilson and Sampson Although this building bears the date “1897” on its front, Eckert dates it to 1899-1900 and credits it to Charlton, Gilbert & Demar.1 The two-story building has had its cornice removed and its first floor altered, but the second floor exhibits three graceful round-arched windows […]

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Seth D. North & Son Store

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by Dany Peavey, Stevan Sliger, John Krystof, and Travis Dvorak Architect: Demar & Lovejoy Location: Quincy Hill, Hancock Built: 1894-95 Contractor: E. E. Grip & Co. Demolished This building was a two-story store constructed of variegated Jacobsville sandstone. Paired plate-glass windows flanked the round-arched center entrance. Round-arched windows illuminated the second floor. The building had no cornice. Quincy Mining Company built a store and operated it in 1863-64, but lost […]

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