Copper Country Architects

Biographical Dictionary of Copper Country Architects

Tag: 1900s

Harris House

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by Jeremy Rickli Architect: Henry Leopold Ottenheimer Location: 108 Center Street, Hancock Built: 1909 The Harris House was constructed for Samuel B. Harris and his son, John Harris.1 Cornish-born Samuel Harris was superintendent of the Quincy mine from 1884-1902 and was succeeded, briefly, by his college-educated son, John. The two men shared the house. The building is located on the top of a bluff that overlooks the Portage Canal, and sits […]

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Tambellini Block

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by A. K. Hoagland Architect: Frank W. Hessenmueller Alternative Name: Luigi’s Location: 508-10 Portland St., Calumet Built: 1909 John Tambellini had this building constructed for his saloon, with apartments above.1 The three-story building is faced with an orange-ish brick, trimmed in a grid pattern with a dark purple brick. There are three entrances on the front: a canted entrance at the alley; a center doorway that provides access to the upper […]

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St. Anne’s Parsonage

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by A. K. Hoagland Architect: Frank W. Hessenmueller Location: 25719 5th Street, Calumet Built: 1909 A French Canadian congregation built St. Anne’s Roman Catholic Church in 1900 at the corner of 5th and Scott streets. In 1909, the congregation replaced the pre-existing parsonage next door on Scott Street with this large brick building.1 Hessenmueller employed a Tudor Revival style, probably in an effort to make it compatible with the Gothic Revival church. The […]

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Hubbard House (Houghton)

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by David Daavettila Architect: Alexander Chadbourne Eschweiler Location: 402 E. Fairview, Houghton Built: ca. 1909 Lucius L. Hubbard had been the state geologist before he was hired to manage Champion Mine in 1899. Hubbard was forced out by 1905, though, and moved to Houghton, from where he presided over the Ojibway Mining Company in Keweenaw County. By 1910 he was living in this house designed for him by Eschweiler.1 The […]

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Painesdale High School

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by David Daavettila Architect: Alexander Chadbourne Eschweiler Alternative Name: Jeffers High School Location: 43084 Goodell Street, Painesdale Built: 1909 Addition: 1934-35, John D. Chubb, architect This Jacobean Revival building was constructed of rough-cut Jacobsville sandstone. The 140’-long building has a flat roof with shaped parapets on each end of the building. It has a symmetrical façade with five main windows, except the center portion, which has three. The central arched entrance bay […]

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St. Joseph’s Catholic Church

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by Kiel Vanderhovel and Derek Dykens. Architect: Shand & Eastman Location: 8th and Oak Streets, Calumet Alternate Name: St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church Built: 1903-081 Slovenians separated from Sacred Heart Church in Calumet Township to form their own congregation, called St. Joseph’s.  In 1903 they replaced their frame structure built in 1889 with this magnificent Jacobsville sandstone twin-towered church.  The Romanesque Revival style is seen in the round arches of […]

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Worcester House

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by Jason Cope Architect: Paul H. Macneil Alternative Name: Michigan Technological University, Sigma Rho Fraternity House Location: US 41, east side, Chassell Built: 1908; destroyed by fire 1974 Contractor: Edward Ulseth The village of Chassell formed around the mill of the Sturgeon River Lumber Company beginning in 1887. In 1902 Charles Henry Worcester of Chicago bought the company for $65,000 and organized the Worcester Lumber Company the next year. At […]

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Ahmeek Mine Office

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by Jason Cope Architect: Paul H. Macneil Location: Ahmeek Location Built: 1908 Calumet & Hecla Mining Company began to develop the Ahmeek Mine in 1907 and commissioned this building from Paul Macneil the following year. The office is located between the residential area in Ahmeek Location and the mine shaft. The brick building with sandstone trim is the only masonry building in the area. It is one-and-a-half stories tall with […]

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Italian Hall

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by Jason Cope Architect: Paul H. Macneil Location: 7th St., Calumet Built: 1908, demolished 1984 The Italian Hall was a two-story building constructed for the Italian Benevolent Society. The first floor had two businesses: Vairo’s saloon and the Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. The second floor had a large meeting hall. The Italian Renaissance Revival-style brick building was distinguished by a row of round-arched windows across the façade. The […]

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St. Joseph’s Catholic Church (Interior)

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by Jason Cope Architect: Paul H. Macneil Alternative Name: St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church Interior Location: 8th and Oak Sts., Calumet Completed: 1908 The Slovenian congregation of St. Joseph’s hired Paul Macneil to design the interior of its new structure. Construction had begun on the church in 1903 to the designs of Shand & Eastman, but that firm was no longer functioning by the time the congregation was ready to […]

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