Copper Country Architects

Biographical Dictionary of Copper Country Architects

Architects

The following architects have been active in the Copper Country:

 

  • Gunnar Birkerts by Mike Fleck. Gunnar Birkerts (1925-2017) had an international practice and a reputation for dramatic expressionist buildings. His only work in the Upper Peninsula, the Rozsa Center for the Performing Arts, is typically sculptural and striking. Biography Birkerts was born in Riga, Latvia, on January 17, 1925. He attended Technische Hochschule in Stuttgart, Germany, where he obtained a ...
  • Erhard Brielmaier and E. Brielmaier & Sons by Stephanie Trevino. Erhard Brielmaier (1841-1917), a Milwaukee architect with a wide practice in church architecture, designed one of the largest and most elaborate churches in the Copper Country. Biography Erhard Brielmaier was born in Neufra near Rottweil, Wurtemburg, Germany on January 7, 1841. In 1850, he moved to Cincinnati with his family.1 During this time, many German Catholics ...
  • Wells D. Butterfield by A. K. Hoagland. Wells D. Butterfield was a Detroit architect with a specialty in churches. Biography Wells D. Butterfield (1859-1936) was born in Algonac, Michigan, and established an architectural practice in Detroit beginning in 1891. He specialized in churches, designing at least 65 of them in Michigan, including the Methodist Episcopal church at Traverse City, Congregational churches ...
  • Duncan Campbell by A. K. Hoagland. Originally a carpenter, Duncan Campbell had a brief but prolific career as an architect in Laurium. Biography Duncan Campbell first appeared as a carpenter in the 1899-1900 Polk Directory1, but from 1901 until 1908 he was listed as an architect. In 1899 the newspaper asserted that “Within the past year Duncan Campbell has designed, planned, ...
  • Charlton & Gilbert; Charlton, Gilbert & Demar; Charlton & Kuenzli; Herbst & Kuenzli by Dany Peavey, Stevan Sliger, John Krystof, and Travis Dvorak. D. Fred Charlton and his associates had the most significant architectural practice in the Copper Country. Although they kept an office in Hancock for only a few years (listed in the 1899-1900 and 1901-02 directories), from their office in Marquette they were able to obtain most ...
  • John D. Chubb by A. K. Hoagland. Although based in Chicago, John D. Chubb gained a lot of Upper Peninsula commissions and kept a branch office in Marquette. With the Copper Country’s architects dwindling in number in the 1910s, then finally nonexistent in the 1920s and 1930s, Chubb took on a few projects here. Biography John D. Chubb (1869-1938) was born ...
  • Claude & Starck by Chase Sturos. The Wisconsin-based architects Louis W. Claude (1868-1951) and Edward F. Starck (1868-1947) produced a wide range of buildings, but specialized in institutional structures. Among them were more than thirty public libraries throughout Wisconsin and its surrounding states, including the Houghton Public Library (Portage Lake District Library). Biography Louis W. Claude was born in 1868 in ...
  • Oscar Cobb by A. K. Hoagland. Oscar Cobb, a prominent theater architect from Chicago, designed one of the Copper Country’s most prestigious theaters. Biography Oscar Cobb (1842-1908) was born in Maine and began his career as a carpenter and joiner. Immediately following the Chicago fire of 1871, he moved to Chicago and hung out his shingle as an architect. By ...
  • Dow, Howell, Gilmore & Associates by Sarah Nunn. Although Alden B. Dow (1904-1983) never lived in the Copper Country, his firm, Dow, Howell, Gilmore, & Associates, was responsible for the construction of Sherman Gym (Walker Arts and Humanities Center) on the campus of Michigan Technological University, where they used Dow’s philosophy of blending architecture with the natural surroundings. Dow believed that ...
  • Alexander Chadbourne Eschweiler by David Daavettila. Alexander Chadbourne Eschweiler (1865-1940), a major figure in Milwaukee architecture, grew up the Copper Country and through family ties became the architect for the Copper Range Company, among other commissions here. Biography Eschweiler was born in Boston in 1865 to Carl Ferdinand Eschweiler and Hannah Lincoln Chadbourne. His father attended the University of Bonn, in ...
  • Frank W. Hessenmueller by A. K. Hoagland with additions by Steven A. Walton. Frank Hessenmueller had a brief but varied career in the Copper Country. He designed a range of commercial buildings and at least one residential building before departing for unknown reasons. Biography Little is known of Frank Hessenmueller, who appeared in the 1907-08 and 1910 Polk’s Directories, but not in the 1912 ...
  • Holabird & Roche by Justin Beckman. William Holabird (1854-1923) and Martin Roche (1853-1927) left their mark on society with the buildings they made for communities in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Their work on early American skyscrapers is one that left its impact on the nation. Their contribution to the Copper Country, however, was not a skyscraper, but the ...
  • Derrick Hubert by A. K. Hoagland Derrick Hubert (1870-?), based in Menominee, designed several school buildings in the Copper Country. Biography Hubert was born in Illinois to Canadian parents, but grew up in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, and Iron Mountain. For a few years Hubert worked with his father, a carpenter, and also at a saw mill. He trained himself ...
  • Hans T. Liebert by Joe Lukaszewski. Hans Theodore Liebert (1877-1966) practiced in the Copper Country for about ten years, during which time he designed several major buildings in Houghton and Hancock, including five houses in East Hancock for prominent citizens, as well as two business blocks in Houghton and two in Hancock. Biography Liebert was born in 1877 in Berlin, Germany, ...
  • G.L. Lockhart by Andrew Bolthouse. G.L. Lockhart, with a practice that concentrated on large public schools, designed Hancock’s high school. Biography Little is known of St. Paul-based G.L. Lockhart, except that he published a book on schools: Public Schools: Their Construction, Heating, Ventilation, Sanitation, Lighting and Equipment (H.W. Kingston Company, 1918), which seems to indicate his expertise. The book is illustrated with ...
  • Charles W. Maass; Maass Brothers; Fred Maass by Morgan Davis. Charles Maass (1871-1959) was the architect who worked the longest in the Copper Country during its boom years, practicing here from about 1895 until after 1920. Biography Charles W. Maass was born in Green Bay, Wisconsin, the oldest of thirteen children. His father had immigrated to Green Bay from Germany In 1862 and later owned ...
  • Paul H. Macneil by Jason Cope. Paul Macneil (1883-1964) practiced in the Copper Country for about seven years, but in that short time he designed one of the area’s most famous buildings. Biography Paul Humphrey Macneil, an architect in the Copper Country between 1905 and 1912, was born in Illinois on April 15, 1883. Both of his parents were also from ...
  • Carl E. Nystrom by David Bandlow. Carl E. Nystrom (1868-1944) was a native of Sweden and worked in the Copper Country for only a brief period around the turn of the century. Nystrom spent most of his career working out of Duluth but designed a few buildings in the Calumet-Laurium area. Biography Nystrom was born in Sweden in 1868 and immigrated ...
  • Henry Leopold Ottenheimer by Jeremy Rickli. Even though Henry Leopold Ottenheimer (1868-1919) lived in the Copper Country only briefly, he designed some of the most significant buildings in Houghton. Based in Chicago, he established a Houghton office for about a year. Many of his buildings were used for apartments, hotels, and banks, but he also designed personal homes for ...
  • Charles Archibald Pearce by Katie Torrey. Charles Archibald Pearce (1870-1944) lived in the Copper Country for only ten years, from 1893-1903. His most important commission was Suomi College’s (Finlandia University’s) Old Main. He also designed a few buildings in association with other architects as well as some residences. Biography Pearce was born on May 10, 1870, in Maryland.1 His father was Stephen ...
  • Byron H. Pierce by Brandon M. Herman. As the first architect in the Copper Country, Byron H. Pierce (1857-1906) designed some of the major brick buildings. Biography Pierce was the first architect to set up shop in the Copper Country, appearing in the first city directory in 1887, where he was noted as “a resident since 1885.”1 Born in Waupon, Wisconsin, he ...
  • Louis Piket by A. K. Hoagland. Louis Piket was a Cincinnati architect with just one known commission in the Copper Country. Biography Based in Cincinnati, Louis Piket (1839-1910) entered into an architectural practice with his father, Anton, and then was joined by two of his sons in 1888. Piket also taught architecture and mechanical drawing at St. Xavier College (now ...
  • William Pryor by Scott Hager. William Pryor (1869-1899), is the only architect practicing during the boom period who was born in the Copper Country, but his career was cut short by an early death. Biography Pryor was born December 27, 1869.1 After becoming an architect, he resided with his father, James Pryor, on Main Street, which is now College Ave, four ...
  • Eero Saarinen by Landon Helmuth. Eero Saarinen (1910-1961) studied sculpture before architecture, and his buildings maintained a sculptural feel as he moved between expressionist architecture and the International Style.1 His only building in the Copper Country was Nikander Hall on the campus of Suomi College (Finlandia University). Biography Eero Saarinen was born August 20, 1910, in Kirkkonummi, Finland, to Eliel and ...
  • Donald M. Scott by A. K. Hoagland. Donald M. Scott seems to have been a civil engineer who briefly worked as an architect. Biography Donald M. Scott (1862-?) was born in Scotland and immigrated to the Copper Country as an adult. He advertised in the 1901-02 Polk’s Directory as a “civil engineer and architect” and lived in Laurium with his wife and three ...
  • John Scott & Co. by Ryan Rosinski. From the 1880s to the 1920s, John Scott (1850–1928) was one of Michigan’s premier architects. He worked throughout Michigan, and his most popular buildings were public buildings featuring a Richardsonian Romanesque or Classical Revival style of architecture. Biography John Scott was born in 1850 in Ipswich, England, where he trained to be a professional architect. ...
  • Charles K. Shand, Shand and Eastman, Eastman and Cowles by Kiel Vanderhovel and Derek Dykens. Charles K. Shand (?–1945) worked in the Copper Country for fewer than ten years and designed many important buildings in the area. Most of these buildings were civic, such as the Calumet Opera House, Red Jacket Fire Station and the Lake Linden Village Hall. He partnered briefly with George D. ...
  • Shaw & Hunnewell by Adam Gaugh. The partnership of George Russell Shaw (1848-1937) and Henry S. Hunnewell (1851-1931) spanned thirty years, beginning in 1873 in Boston, Massachusetts. During the mining boom in the Copper Country, Shaw & Hunnewell designed two buildings for the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company, the General Office Building and the Library. Biography George Russell Shaw was born ...
  • John B. Sutcliffe by Matt Johnson. English-born architect John B. Sutcliffe (1853-1913), who specialized in Episcopal church architecture, designed Houghton’s Trinity Church in 1910. Biography John B. Sutcliffe, born in England, trained as an architect there. He moved to the United States in 1886 and settled in Birmingham, Alabama. There he designed his first church, St. Mary’s-on-the-Highlands, in 1891. He moved ...
  • John B. Sweatt by Bradley Plummer. John B. Sweatt (1846-1925?) was one of the first architects to design buildings in the Copper Country. Originally from Chicago, Sweatt lived in Marquette during the late 19th and early 20th century. He is responsible for some major civic buildings in the Keweenaw constructed in the 1880s. Biography John B. Sweatt was born in 1846 ...
  • Tarapata, MacMahon & Paulsen Associates (TMP) by Brett Schlager. Tarapata, MacMahon, & Paulsen Associates (TMP), a Michigan-based firm with a nationwide practice, designed several buildings in the Copper Country. Biography In 1959 a young Peter Tarapata and Charles H. MacMahon founded an architectural design firm called Tarapata-MacMahon Associates, Inc. In 1961, Tarapata and MacMahon bought the old Tuscarora School to be used as an ...
  • Robert Correa Walsh by Josh Makela. Robert Correa Walsh (1855-1911), an architect in Morristown, New Jersey, with a high-society clientele, designed only one building in the Copper Country, the Quincy Mining Company Office Building. Biography Robert Correa Walsh was born on June 3, 1855, in Washington, DC, to Joseph Correa and Sarah McCall Walsh. He practiced architecture in Morristown, NJ, where ...
  • A.F. Wasielewski by A.K. Hoagland. A. F. Wasielewski, a Minneapolis-based architect and contractor who designed several churches in the upper Midwest, designed just one building in the Copper Country. Biography Little is known of A. F. Wasielewski or how he happened to design Lake Linden’s St. Joseph’s Church. In a newspaper article concerning the building, he was identified as a ...
  • Yamasaki & Associates by Nicole Measel. Minoru Yamasaki (1912-1986) is best known as the architect of the World Trade Center towers. He had a prolific career designing in modernist styles influenced by Japanese traditions and romanticism. Biography Yamasaki was born in Seattle, Washington, on December 1, 1912. He was a first-generation Japanese-American, and growing up he was faced with hardships such ...